NPR Review of Tucker war photography

War/Photography is an exhibition that happened at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington.  “It has the usual array of iconic war photographs: the falling soldier during the Spanish Civil War, Marines raising the flag at Iwo Jima and the Vietnamese general executing a suspected Viet Cong member.”  This exhibition included numerous renowned photographers from around the world dating back to photos taken in the 1800’s.  In this review, it explains that strength of the exhibition isn’t the specifics, but how the presentation makes a collective whole and tells a war story.  This exhibition connects more than 309 different photos, from 25 nationalities, from wars that have been spanning for nearly the last 200 years.  Tucker talks about how there was a culmination of a million images they had to strategically pick in order to make the exhibition flow well together.  Walking through the gallery, each section is differentiated by themes, and aspects of war such as things from recruiting, medical care, fighting, prayer, and more.

One piece included in the exhibition is a piece called Aftermath: Shell Shock and Exhaustion, where it shows an image taken my Don McCullin of a shell shocked soldier in 1968, which hangs several frames away from a piece done by Luis Sinco titled Malbaro Marine.  These photos had been taken nearly 40 plus years apart, but relate so much to each other with the similar gazes they share on their face suggesting the horrors that they had witnessed during war. “Wars don’t end, you carry them with you. our fathers’ wars are our wars and our wars are our children’s wars.

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The Picture Show.  http://www.npr.org/sections/pictureshow/2013/07/12/201327477/what-do-cameras-and-combat-have-in-common (Accessed April 29th, 2017)

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