Zoriah Miller

Zoriah Miller ignited a censorship debate in the New York Times titled ‘4,000 U.S. Deaths and a Handful of Images.’ The article follows Zoriah’s story and coverage of a suicide bombing killing US soldiers during a city council meeting in Iraq. After posting the photographs on his website, Zoriah was contacted by the Marine Corps, demanding the photos removal. Although Zoriah followed embedding guidelines, his time in the military in Iraq was terminated. In the Times article Mr. Miller said. “I took pictures of something they didn’t like, and they removed me. Deciding what I can and cannot document, I don’t see a clearer definition of censorship.”

On his website Zoriah talks about censorship as one of his main motivations to being a photojournalist. He believes the news prints stories that sell not necessarily stories that need to be told. “Some how it has become ok to show violence for the sake of entertainment but not for the sake of news and education” Miller says. Censorship fuels his desire to remain a freelance photojournalist

Originally involved in disaster management and humanitarian aid to developing countries, Zoriah became a photojournalist to document disasters and humanitarian crisis. He believes he can use the power of emotion of the still image to educate the people about suffering in the developing world. He remarks war photography as a natural progression.

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June 26, 2008 Marines who were killed in a suicide bomb attack during a city council meeting in Garma, Iraq, in Anbar Province. New York Times

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City of Baghdad
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Iraq Detainees 

Sources:

New York Times Article

http://www.zoriah.com/interviews.html

Zoriah’s Blog

Zoriah’s Main Website and Portfolio

 

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